Light Field Display Project

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Focal Stack to Tensor Display

A new type of light field display called a tensor display was investigated. Although this display consists of only a few light attenuating layers located in front of a backlight, many views can be emitted in different directions simultaneously without sacrificing the resolution of each view. The transmittance pattern of each layer is calculated from a light field, namely, a set of dense multi-view images (typically dozens) that are to be observed from different directions. However, preparing such images is often cumbersome for real objects. We propose a method that does not require multi-view images as the input; instead, a focal stack composed of only a few differently focused images is directly transformed into the layer patterns. Our method greatly reduces the data acquisition cost while also maintaining the quality of the output light field. We validated the method with experiments using synthetic light field datasets and a focal stack acquired by an ordinary camera.

Project Members

Toshiaki Fujii (Professor)

Keita Takahashi (Associate Professor)

Yuto Kobayashi (graduate student)

Related publications

Multi-view Camera to Tensor Display

ProFUSION25/Lytro Illum to Tensor Display (Experimental results only)

Development of an end-to-end system

Our system was demonstrated at International Display Workshop 2016.

Process pipeline from capture to display.

We have developed a prototype of a layered light-field (3-D) display, where three liquid crystal display (LCD) panels are stacked in front of a backlight. We have also created an end-to-end system where a real 3D scene captured by a multi-view camera can be reproduced in 3D on this prototype display. Our main contribution lies in the data conversion method using image-based rendering, by which a set of sufficiently dense light field data, which is required for high quality displaying of a 3-D scene, is generated from a sparser set of data that is captured by the multi-view camera.

Theoretical Analysis and Computer Simulation

We have analyzed two limitation factors (upper-bound spatial frequency and anti-aliase condition) of a layered light-field display to derive suitable configurations for the input multi-view images. We have also proposed to use image-based rendering to synthetically generate a set of multi-view images that is suitable as the input.

Project Members

Toshiaki Fujii (Professor)

Keita Takahashi (Associate Professor)

Toyohiro Saito (former graduate student)

Shu Kondo (former graduate student)

Yuto Kobayashi (graduate student)

Related publications